A few questions for a new European ally in the fight against wildlife crime

The “Prevention of illegal cross-border transport of hazardous waste and other cross-border environmental crimes (phase III)” project will be implemented by the Oganization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) under the framework of the Environment and Security Initiative (ENVSEC).

Some of these new friends are long-standing institutions like INTERPOL’s Environmental Crime Programme or the Kenyan Wildlife Service, sometimes though, you get a request from an unexpected ally.

That’s what happened when Hanna Plotnykova asked if she could use our Prevention of Wildlife Trafficking training materials in her role as National Project Officer for the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe.

Hanna’s working on a very worthwhile project called, “Prevention of illegal cross-border transport of hazardous waste and other cross-border environmental crimes.” 

I was curious to know more and Hanna kindly agreed to answer a few questions for me.

Q. What will be done with the materials?

A. The materials will be used for development of the e-learning course on detection and prevention of environmental crimes at border. This e-learning course will be produced within the project “Prevention of illegal cross-border transport of hazardous waste and other cross-border environmental crimes (phase III)” implemented by the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) under the the framework of the Environment and Security Initiative (ENVSEC).

Q. Who will benefit from them?

A. Representatives of the customs, border guard and environmental authorities in the countries of Eastern Europe will use the e-learning course to get necessary knowledge and skills in order to detect and prevent illegal movement of environmentally-sensitive commodities at border.

Q. What endangered species would you expect to find?

A. We are more concentrated on capacity building of relevant authorities to prevent illegal trade in environmentally-sensitive commodities including CITES objects without direct focus on particular species.

Q. Why did you ask IFAW?

A. We have asked IFAW because it is reliable organisation which produces relevant literature for the purpose of detection, prevention and minimization of traffic.

It’s gratifying to know that our work can spread beyond our own 15 offices in the fight to end wildlife trafficking.

We all wish the best of luck to Hanna and her team.

--AH

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Azzedine Downes,Executive Vice President for International Operations, VP of P
President and Chief Executive Officer
Céline Sissler-Bienvenu, Director, France and Francophone Africa
Director, France and Francophone Africa
Dr. Elsayed Ahmed Mohamed, Regional Director, Middle East and North Africa
Regional Director, Middle East and North Africa
Dr. Maria (Masha) N. Vorontsova, Regional Director, Russia & CIS
Regional Director, Russia & CIS
Grace Ge Gabriel, Regional Director, Asia
Regional Director, Asia
Isabel McCrea, Regional Director, Oceania
Regional Director, Oceania
Jeffrey Flocken, Regional Director, North America
Regional Director, North America
Kelvin Alie, Programme Director, Wildlife Trade
Programme Director, Wildlife Trade
Peter Pueschel, Director, International Environmental Agreements
Director, International Environmental Agreements
Campaigner, Germany
Campaigner, Germany
Tania McCrea-Steele, Campaigns and Enforcement Manager, IFAW UK
Campaigns and Enforcement Manager, IFAW UK
Vivek Menon, Director of IFAW partner, Wildlife Trust of India
Regional Director, South Asia