Ivory Seizures in Europe 2006-2015

Ivory Seizures in Europe 2006-2015

We have reached a critical point in time for elephants. The number of wild elephants across the world has fallen dramatically in recent years.

The biggest threat to elephants today is poaching. Indeed, the African elephant population declined by more than 50% between 1979 and 1989, mainly due to poaching to supply the international ivory trade. Practically all ivory for sale in the world has come at the cost of an elephant's life.

It is virtually impossible to fully calculate the scale of the illegal ivory market. This report seeks to investigate the quantities of seized, illegal ivory that have been reported across the European Union and to use this data to gain a better understanding of the role the EU plays in enabling the continuation of this trade as a consumer, exporter and transit point for the illegal ivory trade.

Experts

Azzedine Downes,IFAW President and CEO
President and Chief Executive Officer
Céline Sissler-Bienvenu, Director, France and Francophone Africa
Director, France and Francophone Africa
Dr. Elsayed Ahmed Mohamed, Regional Director, Middle East and North Africa
Regional Director, Middle East and North Africa
Dr. Joseph Okori
Regional Director, Southern Africa and Program Director, Landscape Conservation
Dr. Maria (Masha) N. Vorontsova, Regional Director, Russia & CIS
Regional Director, Russia & CIS
Faye Cuevas, Esq.
Senior Vice President
Grace Ge Gabriel, Regional Director, Asia
Regional Director, Asia
Jeffrey Flocken, Regional Director, North America
Regional Director, North America
Executive Vice President
Executive Vice President
Peter LaFontaine, Campaigns Manager, IFAW Washington, D.C.
Campaigns Manager, IFAW Washington, D.C.
Country Representative, Germany
Country Representative, Germany
Tania McCrea-Steele, Project Lead, Global Wildlife Cybercrime
Project Lead, Global Wildlife Cybercrime
Vivek Menon, Director of IFAW partner, Wildlife Trust of India
Senior Advisor to the CEO on Strategic Partnerships & Philanthropy