A full 30 days of stranding dolphins brings the count to 163

Well, Saturday marked one month since we began responding on 12 January, 2012.   

We've found two more dead common dolphins since my last post, bringing our total to 163 dolphins stranded during this event.

UPDATED #'s as of 2.17.12

 

  • Total stranded: 179
  • Found dead: 108
  • Found alive: 71
  • of the 71 animals found alive:
  • 53 were successfully released (75%)

Yesterday we had a young Atlantic white sided dolphin strand alive in Wellfleet. The female appeared to be a calf, probably over a year old. She must have come in on the high tide at about 2:00am - she was as high as she could get on the beach, wedged up against the bulkhead. 

Our early morning crew must not have been able to see her from above. This young dolphin was emaciated - so thin it was obvious she has been deteriorating for quite a while. She appeared dehydrated, her skin was peeling and cracking. 

We worked with our volunteers and colleagues from the Riverhead foundation in New York to extract her from the beach. We placed her on a soft foam mat to make her more comfortable while we did a quick exam. 

Her poor condition was obvious - very low breathing rate, emaciated, unresponsive. She was dying. The most humane thing we could do was to humanely euthanize her.  We put her to sleep the same way a vet would do for a beloved pet. She went very quietly. Although it is always hard to put an animal down, we knew it was the kindest thing we could do for this young dolphin.

We are now back at our operations base. Volunteer teams will be here to re-deploy in 30 minutes.  We will head out to monitor all of our usual stranding locations on the Outer Cape area for signs of animals stranded or swimming close to shore. Hopefully, today will be the first day in almost a month that we will not find any new dolphins in the area.

--KM

PS: Here's a WBUR Boston audioscape of from this weekend, click to visit the article page and the 'listen' button to listen.

Comments: 13

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

i would like an opportunity to volunteer as well. dolphins have been my favorite animals since I was a child. I'm a pharmacist now in boston working with a company that specializes in compounding medicines. If any of the dolphins need any medicines maybe we could help.
eleonor
escharba@yahoo.com

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

Wow. I hope you save all the dolphins. I love dolphins sooooooooooooooooooo much!!!! When I saw that 108 dolphins were dead, I nearly cried. At least 71 dolphins are alive. I am going to be a marine biologist when I grow up....... in fact i'm already studying. Well like my dad would say, try your hardest.

Tell the dolphins I love them,
Maddy von Freymann

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

I would love to volunteer if you need any help. Please let me know @ seacoastangel@yahoo.com.

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

SAD WHAT HAPPIN TO IT

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

myself and my girlfriend are located in harwich and want to help and volunter please let me know anything to help call rory or nikki at 774 722 0142 ,774 722 4492 thanks and thank you

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

I agree with the comment's below. I would love to fly out for a day, if not more, to do whatever I can to help these dolphins. I am currently looking at occupations that will aid in my desire to rescue dolphins. I would love to do anything to help them! If you have any opportunities please email me at arreit9@aol.com. This is heartbreaking!

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

I second the below comment. I would like to volunteer and can come to the Cape for a day soon. Is there anything that I can do, and if so, who do I call / where is the information found?
Thanks.

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

Is it possible that something electrical: i.e.: some kind of low frequency/machinery or a waterside electrical "leak" (not unusual around marinas) could be interfering with the dolpins' sonar?

I am absolutely heartsick. Thank you for not giving up on them.

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

Is there anyway someone can just come and volunteer to help for a day. I realize that to handle the animals takes training, but could someone come to help carry them, fetch things and such?

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Experts

Senior Program Advisor
Senior Program Advisor
Brian Sharp, Emergency Relief Officer, Stranding Coordinator
Emergency Relief Officer, Stranding Coordinator
Dr. Ian Robinson, Vice President, Programs & Int'l Operations
Vice President, Programs & Int'l Operations
IFAW Veterinarian
Gail A'Brunzo, IFAW Wildlife Rescue Manager
Wildlife Rescue Manager, IFAW HQ
Veterinarian, DVM, PhD
Veterinarian, DVM, PhD
Katie Moore, Program Director, Animal Rescue
Program Director, Animal Rescue
Vivek Menon, Director of IFAW partner, Wildlife Trust of India
Regional Director, South Asia