Marine Mammal Rescue and Research team release 11 stranded dolphins

IFAW MMRR teams test the hearing of a dolphin stranded on Cape Cod. The team is gathering important data ideally to aid in conservation measures to protect marine mammals from ocean noise.Following a week-long meeting on whale conservation with the International Fund for Animal Welfare whale team in Reykjavik, Iceland, I was welcomed home Saturday morning with a briefing and news from day two of an ongoing mass dolphin standing. 

I write this post now after day three with just a little jet lag.  ;)

Friday we received reports of about 37 to 40 dolphins stranded all along the shores of Cape Cod Bay across about five towns.  Many were already dead, and some were logistically impossible to reach, but we were able to respond to 13 live animals, and 11 were healthy enough to release…unfortunately one died and the other was euthanized due to injury. 

One animal faltered upon release and was found dead today...a set back, however, the other 10 seem to be doing well.

Two have satellite tags and are apparently traveling well. We also were able to test the hearing on one animal...important data for our project which will hopefully aid in conservation measures to protect marine mammals from ocean noise.

After a late night cleaning gear, we all made it home though not in time to see the Patriots game to which I had tickets! Such are the sacrifices one makes when duty calls… ;(

Yesterday (Sunday, day two) we started the arduous task of collecting data from the remaining dead animals. This is important so that we learn as much as we can to better understand why these mass strandings happen. 

The highlight of the day was rescuing one more animal that we released this afternoon with a satellite tag. All indications so far are that it's doing great.

Well, the winter got off to a slow start, but stranding season is in full swing now.  The team has been putting in 12 to 15 hour days for a while now. Wish us luck in keeping up the pace and although this cold weather is making responses even tougher, it helps to have such an outstanding team, wonderful volunteers and supporters around the world who care.

So far so good...we've been able to successfully release 11 of the 15 live animals we've responded too. All we can do now is hope tomorrow, the dolphins stay at sea.

-- KM

Comments: 16

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

Thank you for all that you and your team do!!!!!

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

I think it is something in the water-the same thing humans or any mammals or fish would do-try to get out when there is something terribly wrong with their environment. Have the waters in near the beach been tested?

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

Hi Katie,

I just saw, on youtube, what happened to the dolphins in Cape Cod... You said you didn't know why they ended up on the beach... We know dolphins use the magnetic poles as if it was a GPS... and we also know that there's currently a magnetic pole shift happening, which would basically cause the dolphin to go toward one particular point (and since we all know they don't have a map of the area, they can't see that there's, for example, a beach between them and that particular point)...

You might want to check that out...

David Icke even assumes that, PROBABLY by the end of 2012, the magnetic north pole will be in the geographic south pole - or close to it - and the magnetic south pole will be in the geographic north pole - or close to it -...

I hope this can help you help the dolphins...

Keep up the good work! :)

SuperstitiousBlackCat
http://twitter.com/SuperstitiousBC

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

Why did they beach themselves, is there a rip tide or something like that?
What should people do if they should see a dolphin in shallow water? Should they call or wait until the animal is actually beached. Are there signs on the beach telling people what to do and who to call? thanks

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

great work!

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

Hello Katie, I just saw the CNN story on your work. I live in Falmouth, Cape Cod and work in the marine/tourism industry. I am very aware of the wonderful work you and all of the great volunteers do for our marine animals. Thank you.

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

We want to help! What a good cause! Moving soon to the Cape. Let us know how to help...

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

I passed several of the IFAW Mammal Rescue trucks on Rte 3 as I drove home to the Cape from Plymouth on Saturday. Sobering always to see the response teams..

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

We are moving to the Cape soon. I would love to be involved with your work!

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

I just watched the movie, The Cove, albeit belatedly. I was appalled at the atrocities being done to dolphins in Japan by man, when nature seems to inflict its own suffering on these animals. These strandings are an example of what can go wrong in nature without man interfering. However, I question the large number of strandings and wonder if climate change, ocean noice or pollution has an effect on the larger numbers. So, I have two questions. One, has anything been done to stop the dolphin round up and mass slaughter in Japan; and two, is there any clue as to why the larger number of strandings with this incident. If you care about dolphins, boycott anything Japanese and stop eating tuna.
Thank you.

Post a comment

Experts

Senior Program Advisor
Senior Program Advisor
Brian Sharp, Emergency Relief Officer, Stranding Coordinator
Emergency Relief Officer, Stranding Coordinator
Dr. Ian Robinson, Vice President, Programs & Int'l Operations
Vice President, Programs & Int'l Operations
IFAW Veterinarian
Gail A'Brunzo, IFAW Wildlife Rescue Manager
Wildlife Rescue Manager, IFAW HQ
Veterinarian, DVM, PhD
Veterinarian, DVM, PhD
Katie Moore, Program Director, Animal Rescue
Program Director, Animal Rescue
Vivek Menon, Director of IFAW partner, Wildlife Trust of India
Regional Director, South Asia