Animal park closes amid complaints, problems

Incident date: 
Thu, 10/22/2009
Date reported: 
Sat, 10/24/2009
Date Published: 
Sat, 10/24/2009 (All day)
City: 
Mentone
State: 
Alabama
Category: 
Escape
Headline: 
Animal park closes amid complaints, problems
Summary: 

At the Mountain wild Animal Park facility, a cougar escaped from its enclosure and attacked a black leopards paw through a fence. The cougar was shot and killed.

Publication: 
Times Free Press
Author: 
Pam Sohn

WATCH: Protecting foxes in Dorset is a challenge

Tue, 01/22/2013

International Fund for Animal Welfare UK Director, Robbie Marsland, reports in via the video above.

Concerned with the reports I was hearing from the field, I was really keen to join our team of Wildlife Crime Investigators to see for myself the difficult conditions they have to endure whilst out hunt monitoring.

Nevada

Summary: 

Under Nevada law, it is lawful to privately possess big cats. No license or permit is required to possess a big cat. Counties may enact local ordinances to regulate big cat private possession.

State: 
Nevada
Classification: 
No Restriction
Color: 
red

Nebraska

Summary: 

Nebraska prohibits private possession of big cats. Nebraska law mandates that no person shall keep in captivity any big cat unless the person was in possession of the big cat prior to March 1, 1986. Some institutions are exempt from this prohibition and may possess big cats. These entities include zoos, parks, refuges, wildlife areas, or nature centers that are either government owned and operated or AZA-accredited.

Classification: 
Ban
Color: 
gray

North Carolina

Summary: 

North Carolina does not restrict private possession of big cats. Cities and counties may enact local ordinances to impose some restrictions or fully prohibit its residents from possessing big cats.

Classification: 
No Restriction
Color: 
red

New Hampshire

Summary: 

New Hampshire prohibits private possession of big cats. Any person in possession of a big cat prior to 1992, however, will be issued a permit and may continue to possess the animal. Exhibitors may also possess big cats with a permit. An exhibitor is a person holding a USDA Exhibitor’s Permit and who shows, displays, or trains big cats regardless of whether the public is charged a fee to view the big cat. The Fish and Game Department will issue the twenty-dollar annual permit if no significant risk to public safety or animal welfare would result from possession.

Classification: 
Ban
Color: 
gray

New York

Summary: 

New York prohibits private possession of big cats. Under New York law, it is unlawful to possess a wild animal as a pet. However, any person who possessed a big cat at the time the law came into effect in 2004 may continue possession. Some institutions may possess big cats, including zoos, public exhibitors, USDA-licensed research facilities, state universities and private colleges working with wild animals, state agencies working with wild animals, wildlife rehabilitators, and wildlife sanctuaries may possess big cats. New York State also bans direct contact between the public and big cats.

Classification: 
Ban
Color: 
gray

New Mexico

Summary: 

New Mexico prohibits private possession of some big cats. It is unlawful for any person to possess an animal classified as a restricted species under New Mexico law and the Department of Game and Fish classifies leopards, clouded leopards, snow leopards, jaguars, Florida panthers, tigers, and ocelots as restricted species.

Additionally, the importation of big cats into the state is regulated. New Mexico classifies non-domestic wildlife in four groups and species listed in Group IV may not be imported for the general public. Group IV species include the cheetah, caracal, Florida panther, ocelot, lynx, jaguarondi, Geoffroy’s cat, tiger, margay, serval, lynx, bobcat, leopard, lion, jaguar, tiger, and snow leopard. However, an exception to this importation restriction may be granted for scientific studies with approved restoration and recovery plans, zoological displays, temporary entertainment, or for importation by qualified experts.

Classification: 
Ban
Color: 
gray

Rhode Island

Summary: 

In Rhode Island, it is lawful to possess big cats with a permit from the Department of Environmental Management. Private citizens, exhibitors, USDA licensed research facilities, and AZA-accredited zoos are all subject to the permit requirement. Permit requirements include a five dollar permit fee, a description of the animal and its place of origin, the big cat’s arrival time into Rhode Island, a health certificate verifying the big cat’s health, and a description of the manner in which the animal’s nutritional, housing, and exercise needs will be met. If the owner plans to breed the big cat, a breeding permit is required.

Classification: 
Permit
Color: 
blue

Tennessee

Summary: 

Tennessee prohibits private ownership of most big cats. Lions, tigers, leopards, jaguars, cheetahs, and cougars are classified as Class I Wildlife under Tennessee law because they are inherently dangerous to humans. Class I Wildlife ownership is limited to zoos, circuses, commercial breeders with a Commercial Propagator Permit, and individuals who possessed the big cat prior to June 25, 1991 and hold a Personal Possession Permit. However, bobcats and hybrids are classified as Class III Wildlife under Tennessee law and may be privately possessed without a permit.

The Personal Possession Permit requires permit holders be at least twenty-one years of age with two years of experience handling Class I animals. The permit holder must have a recapture plan and uphold facility requirements like either living on site or employing a full-time onsite caretaker, and prohibiting direct contact between the public and the big cat.

Classification: 
Ban
Color: 
gray