100+ endangered birds seized in Trinidad & Tobago

A shipment of 83 yellow-headed parrots, 9 black headed caiques, 10 conures, 16 orange-winged parrots, an agouti and a wild hog were seized on Thursday 25th June 2009 by Customs and Excise Officers at Cedros, after being brought in illegally by boat from the Venezuelan mainland. The perpetrators were charged by the Comptroller of Customs for illegally importing prohibited animals.

Yellowheadparrots The International Fund for Animal Welfare's  Colleen Cullen sent this post over about a wildlife seizure in Cedros.

A shipment of 83 yellow-headed parrots, 9 black headed caiques, 10 conures, 16 orange-winged parrots, an agouti and a wild hog were seized on Thursday, June 25th by Customs and Excise Officers at Cedros, Trinidad and Tobago after being brought in illegally by boat from the Venezuelan mainland. The perpetrators were charged for illegally importing prohibited animals.

The offenders were charged for being in possession of protected animals and for cruelty to animals. Most of the confiscated parrots were stuffed into two crocus bags while others were tied to pieces of wood. All the parrots’ wings were clipped.

The game wardens involved in making these arrests were trained in Trinidad & Tobago by wildlife trade experts at IFAW just over a year ago. Among the topics of the training were – how to spot and address wildlife crime and how to humanely confiscate and shelter the animals.

The animals were transported to the Emperor Valley Zoo for care and rehabilitation. Nirmal Biptah, Curator of the Emperor Valley Zoo, laments the appalling condition of the seized animals and the cramped conditions under which they were shipped.

In April, the confiscation of 1000+ animals in Trinidad & Tobago was similarly attributed to last year’s enforcement training in the country.

IFAW is continuing to train wildlife enforcement officers across the globe and has recently conducted workshops in South America and in the Middle East.

Comments: 1

 
Anonymous
5 years ago

It's good to have people who care for these helpless birds.

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