Elephant lovers worldwide say “no!” to killing elephants for ivory

During the last two weeks, International Fund for Animal Welfare staff in France, Germany, the Netherlands, United Kingdom and other European Union countries; Australia and the United States handed over the signatures of nearly 290,000 IFAW supporters to government officials demanding action to save elephants from poaching and illegal ivory trade.

The handovers are taking place ahead of the upcoming meeting in Geneva of the Standing Committee of the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), which is the body that banned the global commercial ivory trade in 1989, but has since allowed limited ivory trade to continue.

The CITES Standing Committee is the body that ‘runs’ CITES.  Made up of officials from governments around the world, it provides policy guidance and drafts resolutions for consideration by the Conference of the Parties (to CITES). The meeting this month includes addressing issues of elephant conservation, including illegal killing of elephants and the ivory trade.

In 2011, more than 23 tons of illegal elephant ivory was seized by law enforcement officers.

2012 is shaping up to be no different, and for the first time in many years, widespread elephant poaching is being reported across the entire elephant range in Africa, including among populations in Southern Africa that were previously thought to be safe. 

IFAW’s recent investigation into the Chinese ivory trade found that since 2008, when CITES gave the go-ahead for the legal sale of ivory stockpiles by four southern African countries to China and Japan, there had been an extraordinary surge in the numbers of elephants being killed for their ivory.

This elephant killing crisis cannot be ignored, and IFAW experts will be on-hand at the meeting to help make sure any decisions made by country delegates are in the best interests of elephants and their long-term survival.

The millions of IFAW supporters around the world who have spoken out for elephants in the last few years cannot be ignored, either. 

The CITES Standing Committee meeting will run from 23 July to 27 July, 2012, so stay tuned for updates and briefings. 

--PT

Comments: 57

 
Anonymous
1 year ago

Elephants form family's just like humans, they feel the loss, they can't say it they show it, when are humans going to stop destroying these precious animals for their own greedy needs

 
Anonymous
1 year ago

elephants have this same right to live like people

 
Anonymous
1 year ago

How can anyone look into those sad elephant eyes ans kill them, please stop it immediately

 
Anonymous
1 year ago

All elephant killing must stop NOW.

 
Anonymous
1 year ago

Thank you for your efforts to protect the elephants,Alice Shore

 
Anonymous
1 year ago

Killing an elephant is nothing less than murder.

 
Anonymous
1 year ago

The elephants cannot be decimated & wiped out in our life time. It would be a shocking blight on our responsibility to ensure the safety and longevity of these and all creatures we are entrusted with. BAN ALL TRADE IN IVORY (& Rhino Horn) NOW. It worked before, do it again before its too late,.

 
Anonymous
1 year ago

Now
More than 250 dead elephants,
Found rotting in a Congo swamp.
Bullet ridden, mutilated,
No tusks found,
In the poacher’s camp.

A full herd exterminated,
Never more to be.
Only pictures in books,
For your children
To see.

105 rhino horns,
Discovered in London.
One percent of the
Population of White Rhino,
In one fell swoop.
But will the rhino,
In number,
Ever recoup?

This is not old news,
It happens every day.
Natural resources,
Squandered and how,
It happened yesterday,
And it’s still
Happening – now!

1999
© DAVID NICOLL

 
Anonymous
1 year ago

No to killing elephants period...for ivory or any other reason

 
Anonymous
1 year ago

If the penalty for killing an elephant were hanging or shot by a firing squad, this horrendous practice would stop!

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Experts

Céline Sissler-Bienvenu, Director, France and Francophone Africa
Director, France and Francophone Africa
Dr. Cynthia Moss, IFAW Elephant Expert
IFAW Elephant Expert
Grace Ge Gabriel, Regional Director, Asia
Regional Director, Asia
James Isiche, Regional Director, East Africa
Regional Director, East Africa
Jason Bell, Program Director, Elephants Regional Director, South Africa
Program Director, Elephants, Regional Director, South Africa
Peter Pueschel, Director, International Environmental Agreements
Director, International Environmental Agreements
Vivek Menon, Director of IFAW partner, Wildlife Trust of India
Regional Director, South Asia