Reinforcement Needed: Dolphin Strandings Day 27

The short video below was produced by the International Fund for Animal Welfare team. One way to help the team effort is through the sharing of this document with concerned friends and family.

As you may have learned from media reports over the past few days, the unprecedented stranding of common dolphins on Cape Cod continues.

As our rescue and research team packs their gear for another foray onto the cold dark beaches at low tide, Katie asked me to share the entire team’s gratitude for the outpouring of support from individuals and the media interest, and to do what I can to help bring you up to date.

This mass stranding event began on January 12.

Today is the 27th consecutive day of dolphin stranding.

As of yesterday (Monday, February 6, 2012):

Total number of animals stranded – 132

Total number of live animals – 54

Total number released successfully – 37

The first priority of the team is always to rescue and release as many animals as possible.  But they also collect valuable data from each animal – health assessments are done on the stranded animals, identification tags are placed on the dolphins prior to release and we also perform necropsies on the deceased animals. All this data helps provide baseline data for a wide range of marine mammal research and helps improve stranding response success rates.

Unfortunately, it takes some time for results to be returned from many of the tests administered during this event. We need time to gather more data and analyze it before speculating on potential causes for this stranding event.

Last week, I shared the news that Katie Moore, who leads our Marine Mammal Rescue and Research (MMRR) team would be briefing Congress on the dolphin strandings.

Standing before Representatives William Keating and Ed Markey, key Congressional staffers and members of NOAA, Katie provided an update on the strandings, showed heart-tugging photos and video, and explained the type of data we are gathering.

The rescue and research process for these mass strandings is a difficult and expensive endeavor. Although much of our rescue efforts are funded by contributions from individual donors, we also receive significant funding from the John H. Prescott Stranding Grant Program, a federal grant program is in danger of being cut from the budget. As Katie told the Cape Cod Times, “It's a little-known program, so it might seem easy to get rid of to those that don't know the value of it."

As we have mentioned before, strandings during this time of year are not unusual on the shores of the Cape. Strandings of this magnitude during this period of time are unprecedented. In the past 26 days alone, the number of stranded dolphins has already surpassed the average number of strandings in 12 months, which means we’ve used more of the allotted funding than anticipated.

I’m very proud of Katie and our team of rescuers, researchers and scientists who have been working around the clock to help these dolphins and we are extremely grateful to our generous supporters who are essential to keeping this team in the field for as long as the strandings continue.

If you’d like to help, consider making a donation in support of this amazing team's efforts.

Thank you.

--FO

Comments: 17

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

Pity theres no office here in new zealand!!

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

Please let everyone know the ways you need help. Whether its manpower or money, please let those able, help you now.

I want to help. Mostly, I want to help you educate those, unfortunate enough, who cannot experience the ocean or what it has to provide. I am a teacher,my first love is biology and animals however, I am privileged to have the opportunity to teach young people about the world around them and the impact they are able to make. I want to further that cause.

Let me help,
ScienceTeacher86

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

Today is March 7th. Can you please update us on the Dolphin rescue? We just heard about it last week and donated to the cause, but would like to know how it is going and what else can be done. Thank you.

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

I wish Icould be ther to help. Thank you so much for your tireless efforts to save these dolphins. You are all heroes!!

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

I fully support and commend everything you are doing for these animals. Wonderful job to all the volunteers who give their time to help these animals.

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

If the area is wide or small and once was a water area, I great idea to help is to in list some scooper planes to fluid the area and it would push the water and animals out to sea. why wait for a tide when you can make one your self. Depending on the area to how many time it needs to be scooped and dumped. If not it a great way to keep them wet when there waiting to be moved saving life's that way.. but idea like this is just trash ...

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

THERE IS A CERTAIN TYPE OF ALGAE WHICH HAS A TOXIN IN THE ALGAE; WHAT THIS DOES IS THE ALAGE DEPLETES A CERTAIN NUTRIENT KNOWN AS "THIAMINE VITAMIN B1"; what happens is: The Algae depletes the thiamien vitamin B1; the depletion of this Vitamin causes "loss of balance...confusion...and other mental impairments; soooo what you can do is : Give one of the Dolphins a "THIAMINE VITAMIN B1 SHOT (by a Vet.) and see if this restores the Dolphins SENSE OF BALANCE which has been proven.... ALGAE DEPLETES THIAMINE; loss of Thiamine causes "loss of balance and navigation...!

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

I'm in Western Ma and could lend a hand over the weekend,,,,how can we help?

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

In reply to older posts, I discovered this link in searching the site.

http://www.ifaw.org/us/our-work/animal-rescue/volunteer-opportunities

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

I am in Canada, and like others who have commented, I would also like to help. I could make myself available on a full-time basis and immediately, on my own dime, and could be there in 8 hours time. Please provide more info on how people can volunteer.

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Experts

Senior Program Advisor
Senior Program Advisor
Brian Sharp, Emergency Relief Officer, Stranding Coordinator
Emergency Relief Officer, Stranding Coordinator
Dr. Ian Robinson, Vice President, Programs & Int'l Operations
Vice President, Programs & Int'l Operations
IFAW Veterinarian
Gail A'Brunzo, IFAW Wildlife Rescue Manager
Wildlife Rescue Manager, IFAW HQ
Veterinarian, DVM, PhD
Veterinarian, DVM, PhD
Katie Moore, Program Director, Animal Rescue
Program Director, Animal Rescue
Manager, Animal Rescue-Disasters
Vivek Menon, Director of IFAW partner, Wildlife Trust of India
Regional Director, South Asia