I Found A Way to help animals

This year, the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) Australia celebrates 30 years of finding ways to help rescue and protect animals. We’ve always been a hands-on organisation with a practical approach and a ‘roll up your sleeves’ team of people to get the job done.

So it is with great excitement and pride that we’ve launched a campaign here in Australia, one that not only showcases IFAW’s work, but also celebrates the potential we all have together to make a very real difference to individual animals, vulnerable species and their habitats.

Thank you for wanting to find out more about what we do. I thought you may be interested to learn more about some of the animals in the I Found a Way stories.

An injured brushtail possum.The brushtail possum we featured was one of the many native animals effected by the 2009  Black Saturday fires which swept across large parts Victoria. The fires devastated communities, 173 people tragically lost their lives, thousands of homes were  destroyed and an estimated 7,500 people were left homeless. The fires ravaged 400,000 hectares of land which was, home to many species of native wildlife including this bushtail possum. He was one of the 142 animals that IFAW managed to rescue and rehabilitate during those dreadful days.

The fluke of one of our humpback whale friends. This photo was taken in Silver Bank in the Dominican Republic.The second star of our campaign is a humpback whale; IFAW works in a number of countries to protect whale habitat and oppose commercial whaling. This photo was taken in Silver Bank in the Dominican Republic.  IFAW has been active in this area since 2006, when we helped form CARIBwhale, an association committed to conserving whales and their habitats, by promoting responsible whale and dolphin watching as an alternative to whaling.  This message was important then and remains so today. 

As well as promoting responsible whale watching we will also conduct non-invasive scientific research and support educational programs and community involvement.

Seeing a wild Amur tiger is now practically impossible.You may also have seen the Amur tiger featured in our campaign. More commonly known as a Siberian tiger, these magnificent creatures are one of the most endangered animals in the world – less than 350 individuals remain. Seeing a wild Amur tiger is now practically impossible and saving an orphaned one is even harder, but that’s what our Russian colleagues did late in May 2013. IFAW found a way – read more about Cinderella, the Amur tiger’s release here.

Over coming weeks, we will be sharing I Found a Way stories from IFAW Australia staff highlighting how they found a way to help animals. Sign up here for these and for our regular emails, or join us on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. We’d also love to hear from you. Please tell us what you are doing, how you have found a way to protect the animals you love.

See our new "I Found A Way" sixty second campaign spot above.

-- IM

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Experts

Cora Bailey
Director, Community Led Animal Welfare (CLAW)
Cynthia Milburn, Director, Animal Welfare Outreach & Education
Director, Animal Welfare Outreach & Education
Dr. Ian Robinson, Vice President, Programs & Int'l Operations
Vice President, Programs & Int'l Operations
Gail A'Brunzo, IFAW Wildlife Rescue Manager
Wildlife Rescue Manager, IFAW HQ
Hanna Lentz, Program Officer/Campaigner, IFAW HQ
Program Officer/Campaigner, IFAW HQ
Jan Hannah
Northern Dogs Project Manager
Kate Nattrass Atema, Program Director, Companion Animals
Program Director, Companion Animals
Veterinarian, DVM, PhD
Veterinarian, DVM, PhD
Nancy Barr, Program Director, Animal Action Education
Program Director, Animal Action Education
Rebecca Brimley, Program Advisor
Program Advisor
Manager, Animal Rescue-Disasters