IFAW Goes Long Way to Rescue 36 Dogs in Northern Canada

Twenty hours from Toronto, in a remote part of the province of Quebec, IFAW (International Fund for Animal Welfare) is providing veterinary services to the dogs of the Cree Nation. There is little or no access to vet care in this region. Without veterinary care, and few opportunities for re-homing, sick, injured or unwanted roaming dogs and puppies are often killed. Recently, IFAW stepped in to rescue 36 dogs and puppies that were to be shot. IFAW staff member, Meg Canty, spoke of her experience in Canada:

Bobby I flew to Montreal with another IFAW staff member, where we picked up 40 crates and two vans. After an eight-hour drive, we met up with four other rescue staff in a small town in northern Quebec. Another nine-hour drive awaited us in the morning before we reached the community where the dogs would be rescued. I was amazed by the isolation.

Often in these remote communities, puppies are adopted, but as they grow up, some are no longer wanted, and left to roam. IFAW continues to educate these communities about proper care and ownership of animals. We also provide spay/neuter programs, vaccinations, and veterinary visits--but it takes time for these programs to have an impact.

When IFAW was alerted that the dogs and puppies were going to be killed, we notified the community that we would be there to receive any unwanted dogs. Several were turned in the first evening we arrived; the final number rescued was 36.

My job was to drive one of the vans, and to feed and walk the dogs over the fourteen-hour ride back to the adoption shelter. I never expected these stray dogs to be so sweet and friendly--no aggression, no accidents, no barking--they were all so good. I also didn't realize how attached I'd become, especially to Bobby Jean who rode shotgun with me. Leaving was extremely emotional, but I’d go again in a minute. Dogs like Bobby Jean deserve safe and loving homes.

For more information on IFAW's work around the world, please visit www.ifaw.org

Comments: 27

 
Anonymous
3 years ago

Quel beau travail vous faites! J'imagine facilement l,attachement que Meg a pu vivre et les animaux sauvés aussi.
Et oui, comme le disait Ghandi:" On peut voir la grandeur d'une nation à la façon dont elle traite ses animaux" BRAVO!!!!!

 
Anonymous
3 years ago

Congratulations to you all, happily, this world can count on people like you, those dogs and cats won't never forget you.Thanks for them

 
Anonymous
3 years ago

I adopted one of the Northern dogs after fostering her .. I have since fostered more of these dogs , They are wonderful ! I would have a house full .. Thank you for all the planning and talking that is needed to get them out !

 
Anonymous
3 years ago

Congrats to all involved. Job VERY WELL Done!!! I know how much I adore my furkids and can't imagine anyone not feeling the same. You're all angels!

 
Anonymous
3 years ago

The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
"Die Größe eines Volkes und seine moralischen Fortschritte können daran gemessen werden, wie es seine Tiere behandelt."
Those who are cruel to animals cannot be righteous human beings.
Wer gegen Tiere grausam ist, kann kein guter Mensch sein.

 
Anonymous
3 years ago

Great work!
I can only imagine the emotions coming with this job... but it is very rewarding!
Keep it up! You're a great inspiration

 
Anonymous
3 years ago

great job!May we one day realize that all animals matter and may no animal ever die unloved.
Keep up your good work.
http://petaboy.com/

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