Canada kicks off annual hunt for baby seals

Publication Date: 
Ma, 03/29/2005
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“Many people mistakenly think Canada stopped hunting baby seals decades ago,” said Fred O’Regan, IFAW’s president and CEO. “But the size of Canada’s modern, commercial hunt is bigger now than it has been in 50 years.”

Each spring the entire Northwest Atlantic harp seal population migrates to the East Coast of Newfoundland to mate, give birth and nurse their young. In one of nature’s great wildlife spectacles, thousands of seals are born on the pristine ice floes off eastern Canada in early March.

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A seal hunter clubbing a seal on the ice floes off the Gulf of St. Lawrence in the 2004 hunt. 319,500 seals are expected to be killed in this year's hunt, which begins today.

Sixteen Years After Exxon Valdez Spill, Oil Continues to Kill Thousands of Seabirds Each Year

Publication Date: 
Je, 03/24/2005
Recently, after an accidental spill from an offshore rig near St. Johns, Newfoundland, Canada, it was discovered that passing ships had taken advantage of the pollution to dump oil into the sea.
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Yarmouth Port, MA
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IFAW supports call for on-the-spot fines to tackle illegal meat imports

Publication Date: 
Me, 03/23/2005
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Alarmingly, the NAO report reveals a possible link between bushmeat and organised crime. According to Government figures, in 2001 and 2002 bushmeat made up almost 14% of all illegal meat seizures (1), and the NAO report states that bushmeat constitutes around 2% of seizures of all products of animal origin (including fish and milk products).

“The illegal bushmeat trade means high profits and little chance of detection for those involved”, says Jenny Hawley, wildlife trade campaigner for IFAW UK.

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London, United Kingdom
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Rosa Hill (IFAW, United Kingdom)
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The bushmeat trade is pushing great ape species such as gorillas towards extinction.

Mexican Senate recommends banning importation of seal products

Publication Date: 
Ma, 03/22/2005
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“The Mexican senate has demanded the Ministry of the Economy to ban the importation of seal products from Canada. This is an accurate and strategic decision because Mexico is a commercial partner with Canada in the North American Free Trade Agreement,” said Beatriz Bugeda, IFAW’s Director for Latin America and the Caribbean.

The official criticism by the Mexican Senate now means that legislative bodies from both of Canada’s NAFTA partners, Mexico and the United States, have advanced legislation denouncing Canada’s hunt for baby seals.

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Mexico City, Mexico
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A baby harp seal born on the pristine ice floes in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The annual baby seal hunt will begin next week.

SANParks accused of trying to force through elephant cull plans

Publication Date: 
Ma, 03/15/2005
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“IFAW is very concerned that SANParks appears to be presenting a fait accompli in asking the public to prepare itself for the imminent resumption of an elephant cull,” said Jason Bell, Southern Africa Director of IFAW (International Fund for Animal Welfare - www.ifaw.org).

“In IFAW’s opinion SANParks has had 10 years to come up with an appropriate and scientifically sound management plan for elephants and haven’t done so – now, with their backs against the wall, it seems they are looking for a qui

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Cape Town, South Africa
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An elephant orphan is bottle-fed milk at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust in Nairobi, Kenya.

IFAW Welcomes Enhanced Protection for Ontario’s Wolves

Publication Date: 
Je, 03/10/2005
“This decision marks the first crucial first step in ensuring long-term protection for Ontario's threatened wolf population,” said IFAW Canada spokesperson Rob Sinclair.

IFAW also welcomes an extended ban on the use of wire neck snares.  Snares do not kill wolves quickly or painlessly.  Protected species and domestic pets have also fallen victim to them.

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Toronto, Ontario
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One of nature’s great wonders: Annual birth of seal pups off coast of Eastern Canada

Publication Date: 
Ma, 03/08/2005
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Each winter, the entire northwest Atlantic harp seal population migrates to the east coast of Canada to give birth and mate. Unfortunately, the window for enjoying this spectacular phenomenon is short. Canadians will begin hunting hundreds of thousands of the baby seals in just a few weeks.

“The harp seal migration is one of the earth's last great wildlife spectacles," IFAW President Fred O'Regan said.

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Charlottetown, Canada
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A baby harp seal born on the pristine ice floes in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The annual baby seal hunt will begin in about 2 weeks.

IFAW calls on Senate to Pass Bill C-15

Publication Date: 
Me, 03/02/2005
Bill C-15, which passed third reading in the House of Commons in December and is now being reviewed by Senate.  The Bill seeks tougher penalties for the owners and crew of ships who illegally dispose of their oil at sea instead of in port and includes a minimum fine of $500,000.  The highest fine ever dealt for this offence in Canada was $ 125,000.  In the U.S.
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Ottawa, Canada
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Zoos refuse to provide answers

Publication Date: 
Ma, 03/01/2005
Despite repeated requests and an application made under the Freedom of Information Act, the zoos have refused to reveal to the NGOs the answers they gave to the Australian Department of Environment and Heritage (DEH) in response to questions about their permit application.

"We simply cannot understand why the zoos will not provide us with the information we have asked for-if it answers all the questions asked by the Government then why not share it with the community?" said Rebecca Brand of IFAW Asia Pacific.

"Surely it is in the best interests of all inv

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Yarmouth Port, MA
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IFAW helps remove lions, tigers and leopards from private owners in Nevada

Publication Date: 
Ma, 03/01/2005
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“Keeping lions and tigers as pets is a growing phenomenon that is causing a huge public safety and animal welfare issue,” said IFAW’s Josephine Martell, “It’s a bad idea for animals and people.”

The number of Americans keeping tigers and other big cats as pets continues to grow. IFAW estimates that there are 10,000 tigers being kept as pets in the U.S., double the amount left living in the wild in the entire world. Since 1990, tigers have killed 11 people and injured 60 others.

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Yarmouth Port, MA
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One of the New Jersey tigers IFAW and WAO rescued in November 2003.