To be effective, global animal welfare standards need national enforcement

Je, 05/31/2012
To be effective, global animal welfare standards need national enforcement

The expansion of global communications and travel makes us much more aware of the plight of animals around the world.

Global trade increases pressure on animals, whether it is trade in live, wild and domestic animals or trade in wildlife products such as ivory. Illegal wildlife trade causes the suffering and death of untold numbers of animals. This is not the only worrying scenario though; even the legal wildlife trade is virtually ungoverned in terms of animal welfare.

The American bison: both a sad lesson and a living icon

Je, 07/05/2012
The American bison: both a sad lesson and a living icon

Since the Colonial Era, America’s largest land mammal—the American bison— has been a symbol of our nation’s strength, history and culture.  The species was once plentiful in the United States, but was then senselessly exterminated in one of the most short-sighted and wasteful campaigns against nature in our country’s history.  Today however, there are now pockets of free-roaming bison coming back in the West. 

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Waiting hopefully on injured ele Dhara, displaced from her herd during massive flooding in India

Ve, 07/13/2012
Dhara pokes her head out of the nursery building. Credit: IFAW/S.Bararuah

Dhara gets an x-ray. Credit: IFAW/S.BarbaruahDhara, an elephant calf, came to us on June 28th.

She had been hit by a car as she rushed across the highway in her efforts to find higher ground. Dhara is one of thousands of wild animals stricken by the deadly monsoon season we’re experiencing in the northeast Indian state of Assam.

Waiting hopefully on injured ele Dhara, displaced from her herd during massive flooding in India

Ve, 07/13/2012
Dhara pokes her head out of the nursery building. Credit: IFAW/S.Bararuah

Dhara gets an x-ray. Credit: IFAW/S.BarbaruahDhara, an elephant calf, came to us on June 28th.

She had been hit by a car as she rushed across the highway in her efforts to find higher ground. Dhara is one of thousands of wild animals stricken by the deadly monsoon season we’re experiencing in the northeast Indian state of Assam.

Waiting hopefully on injured ele Dhara, displaced from her herd during massive flooding in India

Ve, 07/13/2012
Dhara pokes her head out of the nursery building. Credit: IFAW/S.Bararuah

Dhara gets an x-ray. Credit: IFAW/S.BarbaruahDhara, an elephant calf, came to us on June 28th.

She had been hit by a car as she rushed across the highway in her efforts to find higher ground. Dhara is one of thousands of wild animals stricken by the deadly monsoon season we’re experiencing in the northeast Indian state of Assam.

Waiting hopefully on injured ele Dhara, displaced from her herd during massive flooding in India

Ve, 07/13/2012
Dhara pokes her head out of the nursery building. Credit: IFAW/S.Bararuah

Dhara gets an x-ray. Credit: IFAW/S.BarbaruahDhara, an elephant calf, came to us on June 28th.

She had been hit by a car as she rushed across the highway in her efforts to find higher ground. Dhara is one of thousands of wild animals stricken by the deadly monsoon season we’re experiencing in the northeast Indian state of Assam.

Waiting hopefully on injured ele Dhara, displaced from her herd during massive flooding in India

Ve, 07/13/2012
Dhara pokes her head out of the nursery building. Credit: IFAW/S.Bararuah

Dhara gets an x-ray. Credit: IFAW/S.BarbaruahDhara, an elephant calf, came to us on June 28th.

She had been hit by a car as she rushed across the highway in her efforts to find higher ground. Dhara is one of thousands of wild animals stricken by the deadly monsoon season we’re experiencing in the northeast Indian state of Assam.

WATCH: Spotlight Russia: the first rule of moving bear cubs, you can’t say a word

Ma, 07/17/2012

It’s time for our cubs to abandon the little lair-homes that served as their shelters during the initial months of their existence and go out into the forest. But, since they’re not familiar with humans, not domesticated animals, and can’t be moved in someone’s arms or walked into the woods by leash, the move to the forest is a serious operation.

See video