Ukraine crisis: animal rescues continue despite perils

One of the many dogs helped with IFAW support in Ukraine.

The IFAW Disaster Response team is currently monitoring several severe weather patterns around the globe and readying our responders – hurricanes, cyclones, earthquakes, and forest fires, just to name a few.

But today it is the devastating man-made disaster in the Ukraine that consumes me. Months ago we reported on Shelter Pif housing over 900 dogs in need of immediate help as communities across eastern Ukraine were riddled with bullets and bombs fired with no end in sight.

SEE ALSO: Animal crisis in Ukraine: 900 starving dogs rescued so far

Since May, IFAW has supported Shelter Pif to care for hundreds more dogs, many from residents fleeing the political conflict and from other animal shelters that had to close their doors and flee with their families.

Thanks to you, Shelter Pif received emergency grants to cover over 2 months of food and medical care for the animal victims of the political crisis in Donetsk and surrounding communities in eastern Ukraine.

Our colleagues at Shelter Pif report tragic news of airstrikes around the clock for more days than they can count; volunteers are consistently finding and saving abandoned pets on the streets – these volunteers are continually dodging violence just to show up daily at the shelter to help try to calm the frazzled nerves of the dogs who are also suffering from the constant sounds of war emanating both from sky and ground.

In their succinct reports, the brave staff and volunteers sound more resolute each day to survive the fighting and care for the animal victims within their reach.

Even basic necessities are hard to come by. Our order of dry dog food was difficult to procure as delivery companies cannot guarantee safe passage for their drivers or products in the region. It took several deliveries to receive the much needed food but finally it was all there...

A few of the brave volunteers with the IFAW secured food stores.

Although it was a struggle to get the food, it was not a tough decision for the team to make on September 15th, when they took 20 of those bags to starving dogs left to die at the former Yasinovataya shelter.

The Yasinovataya ‘shelter’ history is as horrid as its present condition – under the auspices of an engineering plant was one of the largest dog shelters in Europe.

The director of the plant maintained the shelter for years until his death a few years ago.

Now in 2014, answering a desperate plea for help, Shelter Pif responds to the site to see over 200 dogs roaming freely across the grounds. We are told that many are so weak they cannot even stand, so many more visibly injured, all are terrified.

The military personnel from both sides of this conflict both agreed to a 40 minute ceasefire so that the rescuers can capture as many dogs as possible and deliver the bags of dog food to refugees staying on the grounds who promise to feed the dogs daily...

Only 15 dogs are rescued before the bullets start flying again…but the food is delivered and those dogs are rushed out and back to the Shelter Pif clinic.

We are more committed than ever to support Shelter Pif as they care for the animal victims of this political nightmare in Ukraine.

As we respond to disasters in different corners of the world, I am reminded that this same resolute determination to help animals in crisis is everywhere, regardless of language, culture and type of disaster, all beings deserve to be free from pain, fear, and sickness.

We watch the news each day hoping to hear that the fighting is done, but so far we keep waiting.

When it is safe to return to the Yasinovataya grounds, IFAW will again support Shelter Pif with efforts to save these dogs.

But for now, the precious bags of dog food will at least fill their bellies and warm the hearts of those refugees who have come to love them as they all struggle to survive.

--SW

The need to help dogs in Ukraine is urgent, your gift will make an immediate difference.

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