Elephant lovers worldwide say “no!” to killing elephants for ivory

During the last two weeks, International Fund for Animal Welfare staff in France, Germany, the Netherlands, United Kingdom and other European Union countries; Australia and the United States handed over the signatures of nearly 290,000 IFAW supporters to government officials demanding action to save elephants from poaching and illegal ivory trade.

The handovers are taking place ahead of the upcoming meeting in Geneva of the Standing Committee of the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), which is the body that banned the global commercial ivory trade in 1989, but has since allowed limited ivory trade to continue.

The CITES Standing Committee is the body that ‘runs’ CITES.  Made up of officials from governments around the world, it provides policy guidance and drafts resolutions for consideration by the Conference of the Parties (to CITES). The meeting this month includes addressing issues of elephant conservation, including illegal killing of elephants and the ivory trade.

In 2011, more than 23 tons of illegal elephant ivory was seized by law enforcement officers.

2012 is shaping up to be no different, and for the first time in many years, widespread elephant poaching is being reported across the entire elephant range in Africa, including among populations in Southern Africa that were previously thought to be safe. 

IFAW’s recent investigation into the Chinese ivory trade found that since 2008, when CITES gave the go-ahead for the legal sale of ivory stockpiles by four southern African countries to China and Japan, there had been an extraordinary surge in the numbers of elephants being killed for their ivory.

This elephant killing crisis cannot be ignored, and IFAW experts will be on-hand at the meeting to help make sure any decisions made by country delegates are in the best interests of elephants and their long-term survival.

The millions of IFAW supporters around the world who have spoken out for elephants in the last few years cannot be ignored, either. 

The CITES Standing Committee meeting will run from 23 July to 27 July, 2012, so stay tuned for updates and briefings. 

--PT

Comments: 57

 
Anonymous
1 year ago

This limited trade of ivory also has to stop. We the human race can do anything to anyone for our personal gain. We have exploited the defenseless animals from time immemorial either for fur, our ornaments or for supplements for our good health. We all know that extinction of any of these species is going to wreak havoc for our Eco system. Atleast keeping that in mind please stop this senseless killing!

 
Anonymous
1 year ago

NO to killing elephants!

 
Anonymous
1 year ago

All of the animales must be alive!

 
Anonymous
1 year ago

The Chinese & Japanese markets are driven by misguided
beliefs of virility from consuming ivory horn & tusks.
Really stupid considering their population densities.

 
Anonymous
1 year ago

WHEN ARE THESE CREATURES OF GOD GOING TO BE LEFT ALONE TO LIVE THE LIFE THEY WERE CREATED TO LIVE. IF WE WANT PEACE ON EARTH WE NEED TO START BEING HUMANE TO ANIMALS.

I PRAY THAT ONE DAY THAT DREAM WILL COME TRUE.

 
Anonymous
1 year ago

We need to educate buyers of ivory that their bangles and decorative objects are not worth the harm done to the elephant families. The same has to be done to prevent the use of bear bile, tiger penis and all other ridiculous recipies that have no proven medicinal effects. Even if 1000s of years of traditional medicine says these recipies work, they (the Asian apothicaries and doctors) should be ashamed of their decimation of populations of wild animals in this time on this planet. The large animals are being poached to the point of collapse. This is not the 15th century. The world is not a wild place with abundant animal populations where taking an animal seemed like a natural thing to do and no one would care. Times have changed. We now need to commit all of our energies to changing attitudes to save these beautiful creatures and allow them peace to live in a land that is theirs. Respectfully, Susan

 
Anonymous
1 year ago

The ivory trade should be banned completely with no exceptions whatsoever regardless it being a "one-time" sale or stockpiles or any senseless excuse. Why do humans need to have animal parts for their "well-being" anyway??? People will not die without these parts!!! Leave these beautiful living creatures alone and let them have their rights to live on this earth!

 
Anonymous
1 year ago

Only when the last tree has been cut down,
Only when the last river has been poisoned,
Only when the last fish has been caught,
Only then will you find that money cannot be eaten.

WE MUST CONSIDER THIS AT ONCE, WE'RE RUNNING OUT OF TIME TO DO THINGS RIGHT AND WE MUST START YESTERDAY!!! IT'S IMPERATIVE TO REALISE THAT WE ARE ENDING OUR OWN WORLD OUR OWN HOME, AND IT'S SO IMPORTANT ALSO TO REALISE THAT IF ONE SPECIES ON THIS BIG NATURE CHAIN SUFFER EVERY LINK OF THAT CHAIN WILL SUFFER THE CONSEQUENCES (YES INCLUDING HUMANS BECAUSE WE ARE ALL RELATED SOMEHOW) IT'S TIME TO ACT SO WE WON'T REGRET MORE MISTAKES, IT'S TIME TO CARE FOR WILDLIFE, AND EVERYTHING THAT'S NATURE AND IRREPLACEABLE!

 
Anonymous
1 year ago

It is difficult to understand how anyone could sacrifice a living animal for the sake of any of its parts but to kill or torture an elephant for such a terrible excuse is a heinous crime and ought to be punishable by immediate action by the authorities concerned, with the severest penalties possible. Does no one any longer feel ANY responsibility for the lives of the animals God has given us?

 
Anonymous
1 year ago

The ivory trade must be halted completely. If there are stockpiles let them remain stockpiles in order to stop the senseless killing of these magnificent and beautiful animals. If there is no market at all for the ivory then the incentive to kill elephants will stop.

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Experts

Céline Sissler-Bienvenu, Director, France and Francophone Africa
Director, France and Francophone Africa
IFAW Elephant Expert
IFAW Elephant Expert
Grace Ge Gabriel, Regional Director, Asia
Regional Director, Asia
James Isiche, Regional Director, East Africa
Regional Director, East Africa
Jason Bell, Program Director, Elephants Regional Director, South Africa
Program Director, Elephants, Regional Director, South Africa
Peter Pueschel, Director, International Environmental Agreements
Director, International Environmental Agreements
Vivek Menon, Director of IFAW partner, Wildlife Trust of India
Regional Director, South Asia