Clean water for India’s tiger guardians

The World Bank estimates, "21 percent of communicable diseases in India are water-related, with over 1,600 deaths attributed to polluted water sources."If you want to save tigers, help their saviours.

Indian frontline staff protecting tigers do so under difficult conditions. They live in remote areas, away from their families, and their livelihoods are fraught with risks.

Their camps feature only the most basic of amenities. There is no air conditioning for those living and working in 50 degrees centigrade heat. They subsist on simple food, limited electricity and communication access, and are far away from immediate help in case of emergencies.

In some cases, access to clean water can be a hindrance to good health.

That is why the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) and Wildlife Trust of India (WTI) recently provided 21 sets of water purifiers for each of the 21 antipoaching camps within Achanakmar Tiger Reserve. 

RELATED: Despite gains, on this Tiger Day, we must remain vigilant

Achanakmar is a part of the critical central Indian tiger landscape that houses more than six percent of the world’s wild tigers. It is connected to the landscape through Kanha TR and Bandhavgarh TR in Madhya Pradesh.

Clean water and healthy food are basic necessities that still elude many in India. According to World Bank estimates,

“21 percent of communicable diseases in India are water-related, with over 1,600 deaths attributed to polluted water sources.”

 

The gravity-based water filters were provided along with sets of pressure cookers and torches for use in these camps, as part of a Rapid Action Project by IFAW-WTI through its Central India Tiger Conservation Fund.

As they say, prevention is better than cure.

--SS

To learn more about IFAW's efforts to save tigers around the world, click here.

Post a comment

Experts

Dr. Maria (Masha) N. Vorontsova, Regional Director, Russia & CIS
Regional Director, Russia & CIS
Gail A'Brunzo, IFAW Wildlife Rescue Manager
Wildlife Rescue Manager, IFAW HQ
Grace Ge Gabriel, Regional Director, Asia
Regional Director, Asia
Peter Pueschel, Director, International Environmental Agreements
Director, International Environmental Agreements
Vivek Menon, Director of IFAW partner, Wildlife Trust of India
Regional Director, South Asia