Dolphin strandings continue, but here are 21 reasons for hope

It's easy to feel overwhelmed by the scale of the tragedy currently unfolding in the cold, muddy marshes of Cape Cod.

In just the last 12 days, at least 85 (and probably over 100) dolphins have stranded on our shores.  They've come in waves as large as sixty at one time, and as small as a single lonely animal struggling to survive long enough for us to carry it to clear water.

The numbers are staggering.  At least fifty dolphins have died before we were able to reach them. Others succumbed while our wonderful volunteers fought to carry them out of the mud.  

But today, instead of focusing on the ones we lost, let's celebrate the lives we were able to save.

In the last twelve days, we've rescued and released twenty four stranded dolphins.  Of course, not every release is successful, but as of today at least twenty one of those dolphins are still swimming free.  

That's twenty one magnificent animals. Alive today. Because people like you care enough to support our work.

I can still remember the dreadful days just a decade ago when every stranded dolphin died.  

I know how easy it is to despair over the seemingly insurmountable challenges of a disaster plagued world. Yet I also know that we can ...and we ARE making a difference. 

So on behalf of those twenty one remarkable, intelligent, free swimming dolphins, thank you for your tremendous support during this difficult time.

We're all exhausted, muddy, and unsure what tomorrow will bring.  But rest assured, if more dolphins strand, we'll do everything in our power to rescue and release them into open ocean.

We have twenty one reasons to hope ... and know we can succeed.

For the animals,

A.J.

Comments: 10

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

It is important to understand that even though strandings have been occurring before the invention of sonar, it does not necessarily mean that sonar is not responsible for at least some strandings. There have been numerous cases, well-documented and well-studied that linked the sonar to these occurrences. Species that mass strand often are even more vulnerable to the effects of anthropogenic activities and the anthropogenic causes should not be dismissed just because dolphins stranded in 18th century.

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

EEeeeeee :'(

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

Hello A.J.,
I just read that you are going to address congress about the recent dolphin stranding in Cape Cod Bay. I just wanted to throw out the fact that dolphin/pilot whale starlings in the southern Cape Cod Bay area have been going on since known written record in the area. Before you go to congress and tell them that theses strandings are some fault of military sonar or anything else, lets take something into account. Cape Cod Bay is in the shape of a natural fish trap. Also, is the rock pile on Billingskate shoals a magnetic anomaly?? Before military sonar was widely used locals from Eastham/Orleans used to harvest oil from stranded pilot whales for resale to industry. There is no way to stop this natural occurrence, so ask for help to get the dolphins off the beach, but don't try to place blame on humans for a preexisting/nonconforming natural occurrence.

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

AJ Thank you for taking the time to talk to me. My sons and i are eager to help. We will tweet, post, and blog. I have also forwarded your website link to those who offered to donate. Thanks for your time and all your hard work!
Pips

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

do you need more volunteers to help free the dolphins?

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

How can I help? I live in Massachusetts and would love to come down and help, but I've heard it that it's illegal for anyone to help in the rescue of these animals if they are not professionals. Is that true? Do you need any other sort of help? I'd love to get my hands dirty, but I can also get coffee and food for the people who are on the front lines.

Thanks, Helene

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

God bless the Volunteers.

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

What would the animals do without you guys and gals. Please keep up the good work.

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

A.J.,

I want to thank you for taking the time to speak with us last Friday in Wellfleet. We were the ones who had mentioned we'd seen the dead dolphin down off Cove Rd., laying next to a small jetty. You were very kind to take a few minutes and especially answer my sons inquisitive young questions. I saw a news report today on Fox TV about a few more dolphin strandings down near Orleans. We came back to Denver last night. I will follow this closely and wish you the best of luck and success with these on-going rescues. I am planning on making a donation to your cause when my "checkbook" permits.
Keep up the great work!

Warm Regards,

Scott Nelson

 
Anonymous
2 years ago

i love dolfins me and my friends are rasing money for endangered animals please donate

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Experts

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Senior Program Advisor
Brian Sharp, Emergency Relief Officer, Stranding Coordinator
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Katie Moore, Program Director, Animal Rescue
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